GPT 4 Can Translate English to CHamoru

We’re working on a series of mermaid designs and asked ChatGPT to retell the story. With citations, to be sure. It generated:

The CHamoru Legend of Sirena: A Girl Turned Mermaid

The legend of Sirena, the mermaid, is a popular tale in CHamoru folklore. This enchanting story has captivated the hearts and imaginations of the people of Guam and the Mariana Islands for centuries. The legend of Sirena is a tale of a beautiful and adventurous girl who loved the sea more than anything else and whose fate would ultimately bind her to the ocean forever.

Source: Guampedia (https://www.guampedia.com/sirena/)

Once upon a time, in the village of Agana, there lived a beautiful young girl named Sirena. She was known for her kind heart, grace, and love for the sea. She could often be found swimming in the ocean, playing with the fish, and exploring its depths.

One day, Sirena’s mother asked her to fetch water from the river for their family’s daily needs. Sirena agreed but couldn’t resist the allure of the sparkling river. She soon found herself swimming and playing, forgetting her mother’s request.

Source: The Guam Guide (https://www.theguamguide.com/sirena/)

When Sirena’s mother discovered that her daughter had not returned with the water, she became worried and angry. She went looking for Sirena and found her swimming happily in the river. In her frustration, she exclaimed, “Sirena, if you love the water so much, then I wish you would become part fish so you can swim forever!”

Source: Visit Guam (https://www.visitguam.com/blog/2019/apr/04/the-legend-of-sirena/)

Suddenly, a mysterious and powerful presence seemed to fill the air, and Sirena’s mother realized the gravity of her words. Sirena’s kind and loving godmother, who was nearby, heard the curse and quickly intervened. She knew she couldn’t undo the curse completely, but she could soften its effects. “Let Sirena’s top half remain human, so she can retain her loving and compassionate nature,” she pleaded.

As the words left the godmother’s lips, Sirena began to transform. Her legs merged into a long, scaly, and majestic fish tail, while her upper body remained human. Sirena had become a mermaid.

Source: The Guam Guide (https://www.theguamguide.com/sirena/)

Sirena’s family and friends were heartbroken, but they understood that she was destined to live her life in the sea. They watched with a mix of sadness and awe as Sirena gracefully swam away, her shimmering tail propelling her through the waves.

From that day on, Sirena roamed the ocean around Guam and the Mariana Islands. She protected the sea and its creatures, and her presence brought good fortune and calm seas to the islands. Occasionally, she would visit her loved ones, bringing them gifts from the ocean depths and reminding them of her love.

Source: Guampedia (https://www.guampedia.com/sirena/)

To this day, the people of Guam and the Mariana Islands continue to share the legend of Sirena, the beautiful girl who became a mermaid. Her tale serves as a reminder of the power of love, the importance of respecting nature, and the unforeseen consequences of our actions.

We then prompted it to regenerate using the CHamoru language.

“I Lengguahi Sirena: Palao’an Mañaina i Sirena

“I lengguahi Sirena, i sirena, para i mañañå-ta yan i taotao i Islas Marianas. I estoria minalago na estoria giya i taotao Guåhan yan i Islas Marianas siglo. I lengguahi Sirena ma uluhat gi hestoria un na’nobela yan un adobenturera na palao’an ni’ sumåhi i tasi ma’s ni’ håyi, yan ni’ mafatinas gui’ ni’ sumåhi i tasi para siempre.

Fuente: Guampedia (https://www.guampedia.com/sirena/)

Antes, giya i båle-hu Agana, gaige un na’nobela na palao’an ni’ na’anña Sirena. I mafamå’ña guaha un na’ånan, grasia, yan sumåhi i tasi. Siña ma sångan åmen na i biha ni’ sumåhi i tasi, måmålikat gi hilo’ na sakkan, yan apmaman.

Un diha, i nana Sirena munhayan para umakapapå’ båle i åmen giyågi. Sirena sumåhågu, lao ti siña mapålli i ma’åñao na åmen. Låo, ma sodda’ sumåhi gi hilo’ na sakkan yan mapagåhes, ti ma tungo’ i dinanña na hakompli i hinasso-na.

Fuente: The Guam Guide (https://www.theguamguide.com/sirena/)

Ni’ malago’ i nana Sirena na ti ma sodda’ gi åmen i båle, ma aligåo’ yan ma a’ague. Lao un atan para Sirena gi hilo’ na sakkan ni’ sumåhi yan mapagåhes. Gi i inaligåo’-ña, munhayan “Sirena, yaguin sumåhi tanto i tasi, yayasgu hao para sumåhi pat mitat åga’ para umapmaman siempre!”

Fuente: Visit Guam (https://www.visitguam.com/blog/2019/apr/04/the-legend-of-sirena/)

Guiya i ora, ma sodda’ un na’nuebu yan ma’ågu na presensia gi i aire, yan ti ma tungo’ i nana Sirena i gima’åse i sinangan-ña. I na’ånan Sirena yan i madrasta-na, ni’ guaha mafamås, ti ma tungo’ i dinanche na ma sodda’ gi sakkan. Guiya i inaligåo’-ña, munhayan “Båba i mitat-ña, mañañaña para sumåhi i tasi, yan i kualiden-ña na å’men.”

Guiya i sinangan i madrasta-na, ma sodda’ Sirena para tuma’tumannok. I atan gi sakkan, ma sodda’ un kulantro, maot yan kinaso, lao i mitat guinahan Sirena ma sodda’ para taotao. Sirena mañaina para i sirena.

Fuente: The Guam Guide (https://www.theguamguide.com/sirena

We just had to ask, Can you speak the CHamoru language?

As an AI language model, I am familiar with the CHamoru language, also known as Chamorro, which is the native language of the Chamorro people of the Mariana Islands, including Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands. While I am not able to “speak” as a human does, I can understand, generate, and translate text in CHamoru to some extent.

However, please note that my proficiency in CHamoru may not be as high as it is in other more widely spoken languages. If you have any questions or need assistance with translations, feel free to ask, and I will do my best to help.

How accurate was it? And if it was near proficiency, it’s amazing, right?


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